Article Review

Article Review

INSTRUCTIONS

1. METHOD: One way to analyze a reference follows. This is by no means the only method, but it is a good one because it is simple, brief, yet comprehensive.

a. Quickly scan the reference.

(1) Read the first paragraph (this usually gives a clue to what will follow).

(2) Read all captions of illustrations (these often highlight important points).

(3) Read the last paragraph (this will often summarize or state conclusions).

b. Read the article in detail.

(1) If you have made a photocopy (YOU SHOULD!), highlight or underline details which are important to YOU. (Because we all have different past experiences,

things important to Student A are not necessarily the same things that are important to Student B).

(2) Circle terms and concepts which are unfamiliar. If they are critical to your understanding, they can be looked up later in a scientific dictionary or

textbook.

c. Look up important things circled in “b(2)”.

d. Briefly re-read the article.

e. Determine the Thesis.

Authors always have a message. They may not always state this message in the first or last sentence, or even altogether within the reference, but by

reading thoroughly, you will be able to determine what it is. Ask yourself this question, “If the authors were allowed only one or two sentences, what would they

say?” Your answer to this question is the thesis.

f. Decide what other items within the reference are most important to you.

g. Type a “ARTICLE ANALYSIS” page using the format below.

This page will condense the reference into one easily-readable page which you can keep for later and which you can use to write a report or prepare a speech if

you so wish.

4. FORMAT: The ARTICLE ANALYSIS should be typed, single spaced within each entry, double-spaced between entries. Indent each line subsequent to the first line

of each entry. The following sections should be included:

(A) Heading (your name, etc.)

(B) Citation

(C) Thesis

(D) Important Points (at least six).

ARTICLE ANALYSIS EXAMPLES:

For brevity and ease of reading, this should be on a single page.

EXAMPLE 1:

Your Name

Course & Section

Date

First Author (Inverted Name Order) and Second Author (non-inverted). Year of Publication. Title of Article. Journal Title. Volume(Number):Pages.

THESIS: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

2. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

3. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

4. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

5. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

6. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

EXAMPLE 2 – REFERENCE ANALYSIS

Ima Student
15 Sept. 2016

Biol. 1234

Miller, Richard F. and Peter E. Wigand. 1994. Holocene changes in semiarid pinyon-juniper woodlands. BioScience. 44(7):465-474.

THESIS: Juniper woodlands depend on climate, fire frequency, plant community composition and structure, and atmospheric carbon-dioxide levels. Prehistorically,

increased moisture coincided with downslope expansion of junipers. Historically, however, juniper expansion coincides with milder winters and increased carbon-

dioxide. Monitoring ecosystems is necessary in order to make proper management decisions.

1. The greatest climate changes probably occurred 12,500 to 11,000 years ago when the glaciers melted.

2. More changes in forests have occurred in the past 120 years than at any other time.

3. The most dramatic forest changes are due to human activity.

4. The most remarkable changes in recent times have occurred in the pinon-juniper woodlands in the inter-mountain regions of the western United States.

5. Since human settlement, pinon-juniper woodlands have been expanding into shrub communities, grasslands, aspen groves, and riparian communities.

6. Paleontology records indicate increases in juniper pollen in the western U.S. areas after approximately 1000 years ago.

1. METHOD: One way to analyze a reference follows. This is by no means the only method, but it is a good one because it is simple, brief, yet comprehensive.

a. Quickly scan the reference.
(1) Read the first paragraph (this usually gives a clue to what will follow).
(2) Read all captions of illustrations (these often highlight important points).
(3) Read the last paragraph (this will often summarize or state conclusions).

b. Read the article in detail.
(1) If you have made a photocopy (YOU SHOULD!), highlight or underline details which are important to YOU. (Because we all have different past experiences,

things important to Student A are not necessarily the same things that are important to Student B).
(2) Circle terms and concepts which are unfamiliar. If they are critical to your understanding, they can be looked up later in a scientific dictionary or

textbook.

c. Look up important things circled in “b(2)”.

d. Briefly re-read the article.

e. Determine the Thesis.
Authors always have a message. They may not always state this message in the first or last sentence, or even altogether within the reference,

but by reading thoroughly, you will be able to determine what it is. Ask yourself this question, “If the authors were allowed only one or two sentences, what would

they say?” Your answer to this question is the thesis.
f. Decide what other items within the reference are most important to you.

g. Type a “ARTICLE ANALYSIS” page using the format below.
This page will condense the reference into one easily-readable page which you can keep for later and which you can use to write a report or prepare a

speech if you so wish.

4. FORMAT: The ARTICLE ANALYSIS should be typed, single spaced within each entry, double-spaced between entries. Indent each line subsequent to the first line

of each entry. The following sections should be included:

(A) Heading (your name, etc.)
(B) Citation
(C) Thesis
(D) Important Points (at least six).

ARTICLE ANALYSIS EXAMPLES:

For brevity and ease of reading, this should be on a single page.

EXAMPLE 1:
Your Name
Course & Section
Date

First Author (Inverted Name Order) and Second Author (non-inverted). Year of Publication. Title of Article. Journal Title. Volume(Number):Pages.

THESIS: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
2. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
3. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
4. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
5. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
6. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

EXAMPLE 2 – REFERENCE ANALYSIS

Ima Student
15 Sept. 2016
Biol. 1234

Miller, Richard F. and Peter E. Wigand. 1994. Holocene changes in semiarid pinyon-juniper woodlands. BioScience. 44(7):465-474.

THESIS: Juniper woodlands depend on climate, fire frequency, plant community composition and structure, and atmospheric carbon-dioxide levels. Prehistorically,

increased moisture coincided with downslope expansion of junipers. Historically, however, juniper expansion coincides with milder winters and increased carbon-

dioxide. Monitoring ecosystems is necessary in order to make proper management decisions.

1. The greatest climate changes probably occurred 12,500 to 11,000 years ago when the glaciers melted.

2. More changes in forests have occurred in the past 120 years than at any other time.

3. The most dramatic forest changes are due to human activity.

4. The most remarkable changes in recent times have occurred in the pinon-juniper woodlands in the inter-mountain regions of the western United States.

5. Since human settlement, pinon-juniper woodlands have been expanding into shrub communities, grasslands, aspen groves, and riparian communities.

6. Paleontology records indicate increases in juniper pollen in the western U.S. areas after approximately 1000 years ago.

OUTLINE EXAMPLE:

EXAMPLE:

Name ________________
Date _________________
Lecture Section ________

TITLE

I. Introduction [Why this topic is important; catch your audience’s interest!]
A.
B. can be more details here….
………….
II. Background Information [Information > 5 years; historical aspects Can be older depending on topic.]
A.
B. can be more details
………….
III. New Information [Information < 3 years old; the main emphasis of your presentation. Can be in any order] A. Scientific Study 1 (do the same for all studies and review paper) a. Where did study take place? b. What were the objectives of the study? c. Explain the methodology, the materials used d. Explain the results of study. e. Include a graph is you can f. Explain their findings, results, and conclusion. B. Scientific Study 2 C. Scientific Study 3 D. Review Paper and/or Scientific Study 4 ............. IV. Conclusion [Your interpretations; how this new information has changed things and what you think the outlook for the future will be.] A. B. ............. LITERATURE CITED [A listing of your references in alphabetical order by first author’s last name. Be sure to use proper science citation format!] _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _. 5. IMPORTANT NOTES: a. The citation should follow standard scientific format. If there are three or more authors, use et al. If you have questions or need examples, please see your instructor. Citation (use APA format) When you use facts or ideas that are not your own you must cite the source of your information. This will help others to know where you got the facts or information in case that person would like additional details about your subject. Also, it is important not to plagiarize the work of others. Plagiarism is taking the ideas or work of someone else and using them as if they were your own. Plagiarism is a crime. While editorial policies of various journals vary, these policies must be followed precisely. In many areas of biology, the following citation format is used: Author’s last name, first name or initials. Year of publication. Article title. Journal title. Journal volume (Journal number): page numbers. This is the ONLY correct way a citation will be accepted when doing your analyses and literature citations. Examples are given below. Note that some have one, two, three, or no authors. For articles with three or more authors, use the first author’s name followed by a comma and et al. There are no quotation marks or underlining used for the title of the article or the journal. The first line of the citation begins even with the left margin. All subsequent lines are indented. Barnes, Roger. 1979. Cyanate and sickle cell anemia. Scientific American. 189(4):196-201. Smith, K. and M. Jones. 1980. The behavior of wasps. BioScience. 49:14-16. Anonymous. 1977. Brain chemistry may influence behavior. Nation’s Health. 26:39-45. Grindal, S. D., et al. 1992. The influence of precipitation on reproduction by Myotis bats in British Columbia. The American Midland Naturalist. 128(2):339-344. Books: Bolt, Bruce A. 1988. Earthquakes: A Primer. W. H. Freeman and Company, New York. 282 pp. Whitney, E. R., E. M. N. Hamilton, and S. R. Rolfes. 1990. Chapter 12, Energy balance and weight control. In: Understanding Nutrition, Fifth Edition. West Publishing Company, St. Paul. pp. 348-394. Hogan, M. J. and D. Goss. 1990. A family checklist to conserve energy. In: Cutting Energy Costs: The 1990 Yearbook of Agriculture. J. Hayes, ed. U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. pp. 134-140. Repeat this format exactly when writing your citation. A. . A sample RESEARCH ANALYSIS is above under example. Please examine it carefully. B. PROOFREAD!!! One point will be deducted for each three (3) errors in spelling, punctuation, grammar, typing, etc.

find the cost of your paper