business information system ISYS1000: Assignment Outline

business information system
ISYS1000: Assignment Outline
Assignment Task
The assignment for ISYS1000 requires you to use the Information Systems Description Framework (ISDF) to
describe an information system that you choose from your own world (e.g. from your work, home, community,
or elsewhere) or a new information system you are proposing. It is due Sunday May 14, 23:59.
Background: What is the Information Systems Description Framework?
The Information Systems Description Framework is a simple step by step process used to describe an
Information System. The framework is introduced in Workshop 02, which includes a number of examples of
how the framework is used in a real-life scenario (called a ‘case’). There are a number of supporting documents
available for students to read in Blackboard, including some cases/scenarios and examples of other students’
assignments. Examples presented are of varying quality and contexts.
Assessment » Assignment » …
A template for your assignment is provided for you in Blackboard.
Assessment » Assignment » ISYS1000.Assignment1.Template.dot
Note: This is word document template file (see the extension is *.dot, not *.doc). Save the
word file initially to your local computer before you begin reading/working on it. When
you open this file it is like opening a blank word document (except it has content/layout
in it). This means when you ‘save’ it, it may not automatically have a file name. Give it a
meaningful file name, e.g.; ISYS1000-studentNo-Assign1.doc when you save it, and
remember to save it regularly as you work.
Important: The template has descriptions of the tasks involved within the various sections of the document. You
should use these descriptions to begin constructing your ISDF, but remember to remove the descriptions from
the final submission of your work. The template is compulsory. One of the marking sub-criterion assesses your
intelligent use of a well formatted, properly working template.
Marking Matrix/Criteria
Your assignment is worth 15% of your total mark for ISYS1000. It is marked out of 100, using 6 criteria. The
marking criteria are presented in a table on the following page. You should examine each criterion carefully so
that you know what tasks and sub-tasks are involved and what they are worth.
Addressing the Assessment Criteria
Developing an Information Systems Description Framework (ISDF) involves five tasks. These are presented as
five of the six selection criteria in Table 1: Marking Matrix/Criteria for ISYS1000 ISDF Assignment on the
following page. A detailed description of the five steps/tasks you will do is provided in in Blackboard
Assessment » Assignment » ISYS1000.ISDFv4.pdf
Choosing the right Information System
The assignment task initially involves you choosing an information system to describe. You may choose any IS,
although it is recommended you choose a context close to your own life/experience, as knowing the coal-face
of the IS will help you identify and properly explore the elements of that system, including the users, uses,
inputs, outputs and system boundaries. It is recommended that you do not choose an IS context that too closely
resembles any of the ‘cases’ presented as described examples in the workshops or lecture material. In addition,
do not choose a system that is too complex.
Presenting your assignment
The sixth criterion in Table 1: Marking Matrix/Criteria for ISYS1000 ISDF Assignment centres around how you
present your assignment. A template document is provided for you in Blackboard, which you must use to
complete your assignment. Not only is it formatted for you, it also has helpful hints throughout.
Word template (pg. 2)
Table 1: Marking Matrix/Criteria for ISYS1000 ISDF Assignment
Name:
worth
Below Adequate Above
Number: ND C D HD
Criterion % 0 25 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 Comments/Feedback
1. General Description [12]
Title 1 0.0 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.5 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0
Overall Function 5 0.0 1.3 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 2.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0
Users and uses 5 0.0 1.3 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 2.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0
Instances 1 0.0 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.5 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0
12 <= SubTotal
2. External Description [24]
Inputs 6 0.0 1.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.0 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0
Outputs 6 0.0 1.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.0 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0
System Boundary (External) 6 0.0 1.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.0 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0
System Boundary (Internal) 6 0.0 1.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.0 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0
24 <= SubTotal
3. External View Diagram [15]
Concept: Representation of #2 10 0.0 2.5 4.5 5.0 5.5 6.0 6.5 5.0 7.5 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0
Clarity: Presentation 5 0.0 1.3 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 2.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0
15 <= SubTotal
4. Internal Description [24] 6 0.0 1.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.0 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0
Information Processors 6 0.0 1.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.0 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0
Information Stores 6 0.0 1.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.0 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0
Communication Network (Internal) 6 0.0 1.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.0 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0
Communication Network (External) 6 0.0 1.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.0 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0
24 <= SubTotal
5. Internal View Diagram [15]
Concept: Representation of #2 10 0.0 2.5 4.5 5.0 5.5 6.0 6.5 5.0 7.5 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0
Clarity: Presentation 5 0.0 1.3 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 2.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0
15 <= SubTotal
6. Overall [10]
Presentation, references, template use 10 0.0 2.5 4.5 5.0 5.5 6.0 6.5 5.0 7.5 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0
10 <= SubTotal
10 <= Final Mark (%)
Presenting your assignment (continued)
Working with a table of contents, document
maps and diagrams in a word document can
get extremely messy if you’re not sure what
you’re doing. Thus you have been provided a
*.dot template (compatible with new and old
versions of MS Word). Open the template and
save your document to your local computer as
a *.doc or *.docx. When you are working on
your assignment, open the “Styles” window
to see the styles made available to you. You
will only need the styles provided. The
default font for the document is Arial 11, and
specific texts, such as the text that goes into a diagram/figure, is a set
size, with specific spacing before or after each line. To use a style:
(1) Keep your styles window open as you work; (2) Select the text
you want format; (3) Click on the style you want to apply to that
text. Descriptions of the formatting are provided in the template.
You should remove these – i.e., don’t submit your assignment with
headings that have your heading, followed by the font/style information. Write your heading in place of the
Styles
Window
Navigation
Window
description. Keep an eye on your Navigation window – which shows the document map. Because the headings
have been done properly in the template, if you use them well, you headings will insert into the document map.
This makes reading and marking your assignment much easier.
Submitting your assignment
The format of your assignment should be as follows:
1. Submissions should be in the form of a word document (you may use *.doc or *.docx format)
2. Use the MS Word template provided in Blackboard as the foundation of your assignment.
3. Name your submitted document (i.e., filename) sensibly. For e.g., ISYS1000-studentNo-Assign1.doc
4. Submit your assignment by the due date/time via the TurnItIn link provided in Blackboard.
Due date for the assignment is the end of teaching week 9. That is; Sunday May 14, 23:59. You may
submit earlier than this if you wish.
5. Check Blackboard and lectures regularly for changes to submission requirements close to the due date.
Note re Academic Misconduct
Submissions are to be individual work. Evidence of direct copying of software, models, annotations and
documents will be treated as Academic Misconduct. Use of third parties to complete work including use of
online assignment sites will be treated as Academic Misconduct. Check with the unit coordinator if you are
unsure what constitutes academic misconduct before submission.
Contacts
If you have any questions about your assignment, please contact your tutor/workshop leader well before the due
date.
When should I begin
Begin now. Choose the information system you will build early – so you can run your ideas past your tutor,
assistant tutor, and other class mates. You all have a wealth of knowledge regarding interacting with
information systems because you do it every day. The best assignments are one that are started early, and
considered carefully. This assignment is as much about thinking how an information system works as it is
about presenting it, so don’t expect your first description/drawings to be completely ‘correct’.
Good luck!
Dr Shirlee-ann Knight
email: s.knight@curtin.edu.au

Information Systems Description Framework
Introduction to Business Information Systems (ISYS1000)
19/8/2016 v4.0
Introduction
The goal of this framework is to provide a structure in which an information system can be
described and documented from both an external viewpoint (independent of the information and
communication technology used to realise it) and from an internal viewpoint (in terms of the
information processors, information stores, and communication networks).
Information Systems Concepts
The concepts involved with describing an information system are introduced in Week/Topic 2 in
ISYS1000, although they are revisited throughout the semester. Please refer to workshop 2 for
details and diagrams of the Information Systems . Here is a quick introduction to some of the
concepts in information systems description:
• Information systems description involves investigating an information system to find out
more about it and describe and document what you have found using text and diagrams.
• An information system may process information and may store and retrieve information.
• An information system has inputs that submit information into the information system.
• Inputs may come from people or from external (other) information systems.
• An information system has outputsthat receive information from the information system.
• Outputs may go to people or to external (other) information systems.
• An information system has a boundary that defines what is inside and what is outside of
the information system.
• Information processors are the components of an information system that do the
information processing (i.e. processing of information).
• Information processing can be done, for example, by people, machines, and computers
running software.
• Information stores are the components of an information system that store and retrieve
information.
• Information storage can be done, for example, using paper, folders, filing cabinets,
computer files and databases.
• Communication (or information) networks are components of an information system that
can transfer information from one point to another.
• Information can be transferred, for example, directly in person, by foot, by post, by
computer networks, and by telephone networks.
• Information systems description can involve a textual description as well as a graphical
representation (i.e. diagrams) of the information system and these complement each other
• Information processors(e.g. computers running software or people) are active things in
that they do something, i.e. process information, whereas information stores (e.g.
databases and filing cabinets) are passive things in they have don’t do anything on their
own. Computers write to and read from databases, just as people write on and read from
paper from filing cabinets.
• Communication (or information) networks in information systems connect information
processors, which may send information across the network to one another.
Communication is between two information processors.
• Information processors can also read and write to information stores, and information
flows across this connection but it is usually not a labelled computer network. We show
connections between information processors and information stores to show which stores
they interact with.
• Inputs flow into information systems from other information systems across networks (of
many different types) and information flows out of information systems to other
information systems across networks (of many different types). These are called external
networksto differentiate them from the internal networks between information processors
within the information system.
Information Systems Description Process
To describe information systems we will follow a simple process (i.e. a sequence of steps) that
will break the task down and, hopefully, make it easier for you.
In short the five (5) steps are:
1. Provide a general description of the information system
2. Provide an external description of the information system
3. Provide an external view of the information system
4. Provide an internal description of the information system
5. Provide an internal view of the information system
Here is a description of the process
Step 1 – Provide a general description of the information system
• Provide a general description of the information system by considering and describing:
What is the name or title of the information system?
• Describe the overall information processing and storage function of the information
system at a very high level (focusing on its overall purpose or goal)
• Who (or what other information systems) are the users of the information system? What
do these users do with the information system?
• Give any information about a real-world instance (i.e. example) of this information
system.
Step 2 – Provide an external description of the information system
Give a description of the inputs, outputs and boundary of the information system by considering
and describing:
• What inputs does each user provide to the information system (if any)?
• What outputs does the information system provide to the users (if any)?
• What is the boundary of the information system? What are the external and internal
components of the system boundary?
Step 3 – Provide an external view of the information system
• Draw a diagram that summarises and represents the information system as described in
Step 2. In particular: Use a circle to represent the information system and use arrows
going into the system to represent the inputs and arrows coming out of the system to
represent the outputs.
• Label the information system with its name or title.
• Label the inputs with the name/role of the user (or other information system) that provides
them and provide high-level names for the information the users provide.
• Label the outputs with the name/role of the user or (or other information system) that
receives them and provide high-level names for the information the users receive.
Step 4 – Provide an internal description of the information system
Give a description of the information processors, information stores and networks within the
information system by considering and describing:
• What are the information processors inside the information system? What specific
information processing does each of these information processors do?
• What are the information stores inside the information system? What specific information
is stored inside each of these information stores?
• Identify any internal communication networkstransferring information within the
information system.
• Identify any external communication networks for input to and output from the
information system.
This description should describe the information and communication technologies (both
computerised and/ or non-computerised) that can be used to implement (or realise) the
information system).
Step 5 – Provide an internal view of the information system
• Draw a diagram that summarises and represents the information system as described in
Step 4.
• Draw the information processors as cubes or rectangles and label them with descriptive
names (e.g. librarian information processor or sales processor).
• Draw the information stores as cylinders or ellipse and label them with descriptive names
(e.g. customer store or product folder).
• Draw the internal communication networks as lines between the information processors
and/or information stores and label them with descriptive names (as needed).
• Draw the external communication networks as lines between the users and the
information processors and label them with descriptive names.
This description should display the information and communication technologies (both
computerised and/ or non-computerised that can be used to implement (or realise) the information
system).
Style of Information Systems Description
The textual sections within an information system description are generally not written as
paragraphs of text (with the exception of some high-level descriptions). Instead they are
generally written as lists in point form and the points and sub-points are numbered so they can be
easily referred to in other contexts.
The graphical sections within an information system description are generally constructed with a
specific notation (i.e. set of symbols like cubes, cylinders, and lines) that have specific meaning.
It is important to use the correct graphical notation. These have been briefly explained for the
view diagrams above and samples of the symbols are given in the assignment template provided
in Blackboard
End of Document
Information Systems Description Template
School of Information Systems
Curtin University
18/08/2016 • v2.0

Student and Workshop Details

Information Enter Your Details
Student Name:
Student Number:
Assessment Item:
Institution / Location:
Year / Study Period
Workshop Leader Name:
Workshop Number:
Marker Comments (Optional):
See ACMSheet for Feedback

Contents
1. General Description of the Information System 2
2. ExternalDescription of the Information System 3
3. External View of the Information System 4
4. Internal Description of Information System 4
5. Internal View of Information System 4
6. Further Notes (Optional) 4
7. References (Possibly Optional) 4

NOTE: This template has been given to you to help you construct your assignment. Please remove ALL the instruction material from this template before you submit your assignment. Only keep the Headings (although most should be renamed by you). Lazy, non-removal of content that is not your own WILL result in loss of marks.
1. General Description of the Information System

1.1 Title[style gallery is “Heading 3” (remove this note)]
Name of the Information System[style gallery is “Normal”]

1.2 General Description [style gallery is “Heading 3” (remove this note)]
Write a paragraph or two describing the overall function or purpose of the information system. Do not describe the internal details of the information system. [style gallery is “Normal”]
1.3 Users and Uses[“Heading 3” (remove this note)]
Note: a “user” can be a person or another information system (IS)[style gallery is “Normal”]
Layout:
[name of]User 1[“Heading 4” (remove this note and “[name of]”)]
name and describe the user type (it could be another IS). For example, if the system you’ve built is for students to register at university, the “User 1” is “Student” and you describe here something like “Students use the system (name of your system) to register at the university so that they can enrol into courses offered by the university”[style gallery is “Normal”]
a. Use 1: name and describe what the User 1 does with the information system or what the information system does for the User 1.
use this “indented” format[style gallery is “Indent01”]
b. Use 2: name and describe …[style gallery is “Indent01”]
c. Use 3: name and describe …(if applicable)[style gallery is “Indent01”]

[name of]User 2[“Heading 4” (remove this note and “[name of]”)]
Name and describe …[style gallery is “Indent01”]
a. Use 1: name and describe …[style gallery is “Indent01”]
b. …[style gallery is “Indent01”]

1.3 Instance[“Heading 3” (remove this note)]
Give details of a real world example of this information system, if you are describing an information system that exists, or where it could be used if you are describing a new IS.
[style gallery is “Normal”]
2. External Description of the Information System
This section provide details of the inputs and outputs of the information system, the information processing performed by the information system, the information stored within the information system, and the system boundary. It should not focus on any information and communication technologies but the information processing itself. It should be much more detailed than the general description.
[style gallery is “Normal”]

2.1 Inputs[“Heading 3” (remove this note)]

[name of]User 1 [“Heading 4” (remove this note and “[name of]”)]
Name of User 1 (or other IS). Name of Input Group (e.g. a paper or Web form name, a group of inputs)
a. Name of Input 1 – description of input 1, example of input 1[style gallery is “Indent01”]
b. Name of Input 2 – description of input 2, example of input 2[style gallery is “Indent01”]

[name of]User 2 [“Heading 4” (remove this note and “[name of]”)]
Name of User 2 (or other IS). Name of Input Group (e.g. a paper or Web form name, a group of inputs)
a. Name of Input 1 – description of input 1, example of input 1[style gallery is “Indent01”]
b. Name of Input 2 – description of input 2, example of input 2[style gallery is “Indent01”]

[name of]User 3 [“Heading 4” (remove this note and “[name of]”)]
Name of User 3 (or other IS). If a user has multiple uses for the IS then separate inputs into those for each use (function)
a. Name of Input 1 – description of input 1, example of input 1[style gallery is “Indent01”]
b. Name of Input 2 – description of input 2, example of input 2[style gallery is “Indent01”]

2.2 Outputs[“Heading 3” (remove this note)]

[name of]User 1 [“Heading 4” (remove this note and “[name of]”)]
Name of User 1 (or other IS). Name of Output Group (e.g. a paper or Web report name, a group of outputs
a. Name of Output 1 – description of output 1, example of output 1[style gallery is “Indent01”]
b. Name of Output 2 – description of output 2, example of output 2[style gallery is “Indent01”]
c. etc. …
[name of]User 2 [“Heading 4” (remove this note and “[name of]”)]
Name of User 1 (or other IS). Name of Output Group (e.g. a paper or Web report name, a group of outputs
a. Name of Output 1 – description of output 1, example of output 1[style gallery is “Indent01”]
b. Name of Output 2 – description of output 2, example of output 2[style gallery is “Indent01”]
c. etc. …

[name of]User 3 [“Heading 4” (remove this note and “[name of]”)]
Name of User 3 (or other IS). Name of Output Group (e.g. a paper or Web report name, a group of outputs.
Note: If a user has multiple uses for the IS then separate outputs into those for each use (function)
a. Name of Output 1 – description of output 1, example of output 1[style gallery is “Indent01”]
b. Name of Output 2 – description of output 2, example of output 2[style gallery is “Indent01”]
c. etc. …
2.3 System Boundary [“Heading 3” (remove this note)]
Describe the boundary of the information system to be clear about what parts are inside your information system and what parts are outside.
External Components [“Heading 4” (remove this note)]
External (Outside) Components…
Internal Components [“Heading 4” (remove this note)]
Internal (Inside) Components…
3. External View of the Information System[“Heading 2”]
Click on the drawing below to edit the drawing and include the details relevant to your information system (as described above in the external description of the information system).
Figure 1 – External View of the Information System
4. Internal Description of Information System
This section provides a description of the internals of the information system including the particular information processors, information stores, and any networks within the information system. It now focuses on the information and communication technologies used to implement the information processing, storage and communication needed for the information system described in the general description and external view.
4.1 Information Processors

[name of]Information Processor 1[“Heading 4” (remove this and “[name of]”)]
Name of Information Processor 1 – Describe what type of information processor it is
a. Describe the/an information processing performed by information processor 1.[style gallery is “Indent01”]
[name of]Information Processor 2 [“Heading 4” (remove this and “[name of]”)]
Name of Information Processor 2 – Describe what type of information processor it is
a. Describe the/an information processing performed by information processor 1.[style gallery is “Indent01”]
b. etc. …(if applicable)

[name of]Information Processor 3 [“Heading 4” (remove this and “[name of]”)]
Name of Information Processor 3 – Describe what type of information processor it is
a. Describe the/an information processing performed by information processor 1.[style gallery is “Indent01”]
4.2 Information Stores
[name of]Information Store1 [“Heading 4” (remove this and “[name of]”)]
Name of Information Store 1 – Describe what type of information store it is
a. Name of Information 1 – describe information 1 and give an example.[style gallery is “Indent01”]
b. Name of Information 2 – describe information 2 and give an example (if applicable)
c. …

[name of]Information Store2 [“Heading 4” (remove this and “[name of]”)]
Name of Information Store 2 – Describe what type of information store it is
a. Name of Information 1 – describe information 1 and give an example.[style gallery is “Indent01”]
b. Name of Information 2 – describe information 2 and give an example (if applicable)
c. …

[name of]Information Store3 [“Heading 4” (remove this and “[name of]”)]
If applicable….

4.3 Communication Networks

Internal Communication Networks
Internal Communication Networks (between internal Information Processors)

[name of]Internal Communication Network 1
Name of Internal Communication Network 1 – Describe what type of communication network it is
a. Describe what information processors it connects and what information is communicated between the information processors.[style gallery is “Indent01”]
[name of]Internal Communication Network 2
(if needed) Name of Internal Communication Network 1 – Describe what type of communication network it is
a. Describe what information processors it connects and what information is communicated between the information processors.[style gallery is “Indent01”]
External Communication Networks
External Communication Networks (between external Users and internal Information Processors)

[name of]Internal Communication Network 1
Name of External Communication Network 1 – Describe what type of communication network it is
a. Describe what information processors it connects and what information is communicated between the information processors.[style gallery is “Indent01”]
[name of]Internal Communication Network 2
(if needed) Name of External Communication Network 2 – Describe what type of communication network it is
a. Describe what information processors it connects and what information is communicated between the information processors.[style gallery is “Indent01”]

[name of]Internal Communication Network 3
(if needed) ….

5. Internal View of Information System
Click on the drawing below to edit the drawing and include the internal details relevant to your information system (as described above in the internal description). Make sure your internal view of the information system is consistent with your textual description from part 4.
Figure 2 – Internal View of the Information System

6. Further Notes (Optional)
Please include any further notes or information you think relevant to your information system description here. This is an optional section.

7. References

Please include any references to documents or Web sites you referred to in defining your information system or completing the description.
Please use regular University referencing (in text and here) in APA5th or APA6th format.
This section is NOT optional if you include text or copy diagrams from other resources (including Web pages), you must reference these. References add weight to you work because you are using already established/published material as a foundation for your thinking
Failure to acknowledge use of other resources may constitute plagiarism and lead to a significant penalty (see Unit Outline).

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