Centre for Business Interdisciplinary Studies

Centre for Business Interdisciplinary Studies
Demonstrates effective thinking and problem solving Indicators of
ACHIEVED WITH DISTINCTION Indicators of
ACHIEVED WITH MERIT Indicators of
ACHIEVED
Indicators of
NOT ACHIEVED

Author Excels in identifying and providing evidence for the author’s qualifications and experience and evaluating their expertise or otherwise on the topic Identifies and provides evidence for the author’s qualifications and experience and evaluates their expertise or otherwise on this topic Identifies and might provide evidence for the author’s qualifications and experience Does not identify the author’s qualifications and experience
Excels in identifying and providing accurate evidence from the article for the author’s ideology Makes a good attempt to identify and provide evidence from the article for the author’s ideology Identifies the author’s ideology
Does not identify the author’s ideology

Context
Identifies specific possible audiences for the article and provides an insightful argument why the author wrote for these audiences Identifies specific possible audiences for the article, and suggests why the author wrote for these audiences Identifies possible audiences for the article but might have been insufficiently specific and/or failed to address author motives for targeting these audiences
Fails to identify any possible audiences for the article
Presents an insightful explanation of a credible relationship between the article’s date of publication and the usefulness of its content today Presents a credible relationship between the article’s date of publication and the usefulness of its content today Attempts to explain a relationship between the article’s date of publication and the usefulness of its content today Does not attempt to explain a relationship between the article’s date of publication and the usefulness of its content today
Evidence Excels in its identification and explanation of one or more key points from the article Makes a good attempt to identify and explain one or more key points from the article Identifies one or more key points from the article but may have struggled to explain it/them Does not identify any key points from the article
Excels in its identification and evaluation of the article’s evidence for its key point/s
Makes a good attempt to identify and evaluate the article’s evidence for its key point/s Tries to identify and/or evaluate the article’s evidence for its key point/s but some confusion as to what is an idea and what is evidence might be evident Does not identify and/or evaluate the article’s evidence for its key point/s
Analysis
Excels and is insightful in comparing the article’s argument to another on the topic and/or analysing the article on the basis of such a comparison Makes a good attempt to compare the article’s argument to anothe

Part B – Social Science
This part consists of 2 questions, listed below. It is expected that students will prepare in advance of the test. Preparation for part B will take place in Professional Practice and Social Science classes.

Part B Question 1 is a critical reading of the following:
Kelsey, J. (2011 July 27). Pitfalls of a gold-standard trade deal. Retrieved from
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10740945

You may refer also to any other reading you have done.

In the test you will be given 3 resources:
– A copy of Kelsey, ‘Pitfalls of a gold-standard trade deal’.
– A copy of Jacobi, S. ‘Free up global trade to create growth and jobs’.
– The Critical Reading Guidelines from page 28 of the Study Guide.

Author
Here you consider whether the author has the expertise to write authoritatively on the topic and whether they have any ideological beliefs which have influenced their argument about the topic.
• Do the author’s qualifications and experience mean they are an expert on this topic?
• Can we tell from the article what the author’s ideology is, especially with regard to globalisation and the role of the government in the economy?

Context
The article was written for particular audiences at a particular time. Considering this context for its publication helps you understand the article’s purpose then and relevance today.
• What audiences might the article have tried to inform or persuade? Why those audiences?
• Does the article’s date of publication affect its usefulness for you?

Evidence
There is a difference between the points (or claims, or assertions) an author is making and the evidence that they might or might not have provided to support (or prove) those points.
• What are the article’s main points?
• What has been the type and quality of evidence provided to support those main points?
• If you think there is a lack of evidence, explain why.

Analysis
One way to critique an article is to analyse the logic of the author’s position, and to consider other (perhaps missing) perspectives and information. Another is to analyse the article to see how it compares with other material on the same topic.
• Are the arguments convincing? Why/why not?
• How does the article compare to others written on the same topic? Does it support or contradict views in those other readings? Is it better argued or not? Can you explain any contradictions?

Reflection
How do you, personally, connect to the main reading and/or the readings you considered in the Analysis section?
• Reflect on how useful the article has been for developing your understanding and

opinion about globalisation? Do you agree with it?
• What questions does the article raise for you? Does it support or challenge your world view? If so, explain how .

Students will be expected to write under the 5 sub-headings of the Critical Reading Guidelines from page 28 of the Study Guide. You will not be expected to provide references. There is no word limit.

Part B Question 2 is a short essay. There are three options to choose from; you choose ONE of the three questions below:
(i) Explain how the New Zealand Government came to offer incentives for Warner Brothers to produce the Hobbit in New Zealand. What were the arguments for and against this decision?
(ii) Discuss the impact of climate change on the New Zealand government. (iii) What has been the impact of recent global economic crises on wider New Zealand society? In your opinion how can or should government respond?

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