Corrections: Court Gives California More Time to Ease Prison Crowding

Let’s move into the topic of prisons. Consider the following excerpts from the New York Times and The Huffington Post and answer the questions that follow.

Court Gives California More Time to Ease Prison Crowding
“In 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld an order to reduce the prison population [in California], agreeing that dire conditions compromised the health and safety of prisoners and violated their constitutional rights against cruel and inhuman punishment. Since then, California officials have repeatedly sought extra time to address the problem.
.. even as the judges granted more time to comply with the court order, they criticized the state’s efforts to delay the release of inmates, who remain packed into prisons at more than 144 percent of capacity.
…Until Monday’s ruling, California had until April to reduce its prison population to 137.5 percent of capacity from 144 percent; now, it has until the end of February 2016.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/11/us/court-gives-california-more-time-to-ease-prison-crowding.html?_r=0

 

California’s Prison Population Is Finally Down, But Will It Last?

“SACRAMENTO, Calif., Jan 29 2015 (Reuters) – After years of controversy and legal trouble because of overcrowding in California’s mammoth prison system, the state’s inmate population dipped below the maximum level set by a federal court for the first time on Thursday.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/29/ca-prison-overcrowding_n_6575514.html?

 

Is overcrowding in prisons still a problem in 2015 or do you believe the issue has been resolved?  Support your opinion.

California’s example is extreme.  Are other states experiencing prison overcrowding?  Explain.

What lessons can be learned by correctional administrators regarding the future of prison populations?

For full credit, add new information to the discussion, citing your sources.

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