Expanding Cell Movement

Expanding Cell MovementProject description
Find the instructions in the attachment.

After finishing the Exercise, save your work as Project-2.py
Make sure you run all the code first in python before submit it to me.

For the graphic library, in the class we use this link for the graphics:
http://mcsp.wartburg.edu/zelle/python/graphics.py

Make sure all do all the points in the ToDos and including the extra points.

You have to use the graphic library above to do the code. I will not accept codes from other sources than that graphic library.

CS 177 – Project #1
Summer 2015
==========
This project is due Thursday July 9th before 11:59pm.
This assignment is an individual project and should be completed on your own using only your own
personally written code. You will submit one (1) copy of the completed Python program to the
Project 1 assignment on Blackboard. The completed file will include your name, the name of the
project and a description of its functionality and purpose of in the comments header. The file should
be named ”Project-1.py”.
This project will be the foundation of future assignments this semester, so it is important that you
maximize your program’s functionality.
Problem Description: Simulating the Movements of Cells in a Microscope
==============================================================
In 2014 Virginia scientist Eric Betzig won a Nobel Prize for his research in microscope technology.
Since receiving the award, Betzig has improved the technology so that cell functions, growth and
even movements can now be seen in real time while minimizing the damage caused by prior
methods. This allows the direct study of living nerve cells forming synapses in the brain, cells
undergoing mitosis and internal cell functions like protein translation and mitochondrial movements.
Your assignment is to write a Python program that graphically simulates viewing cellular organisms,
as they might be observed using Betzig’s technology. These simulated cells will be shown in a
graphics window (representing the field of view through Betzig’s microscope) and must be
animated, exhibiting behaviors based on the “Project Specifications” below. The simulation will
terminate based on user input (a mouse click) and will include two (2) types of cells, Crete and
Laelaps, (pronounced KREET and LEE-laps).
Crete cells should be represented in this simulation as three (3) small green circles with a radius of
8 pixels. These cells move nonlinearly in steps of 1-4 graphics window pixels. This makes their
movement appear jerky and random. Crete cells cannot move outside the microscope slide, (the
‘field’), so they may bump along the borders or even wander out into the middle of the field at times.
These cells have the ability to pass “through” each other.
A single red circle with a radius of 16 pixels will represent a Laelaps cell in this simulation. Laelaps
cells move across the field straight lines, appearing to ‘bounce’ off the field boundaries. Laelaps
sometimes appear to pass through other cells, however this is an optical illusion as they are very
thin and tend to slide over or under the other cells in the field of view.
Project Specifications:
====================
Graphics Window
• 500 x 500 pixel window
• White background
• 0,0 (x,y) coordinate should be set to the lower left-hand corner
Crete Cells
• Three (3) green filled circles with radius of 8 pixels
• Move in random increments between -4 and 4 pixels per step
• Movements are not in straight lines, but appear wander aimlessly
Laelaps Cells
• One (1) red filled circle with a radius of 16 pixels
• Move more quickly than Crete cells and in straight lines
• The Laelaps cell should advance in either -10 or 10 pixels per step
TODO #1: Initialize the simulation environment
========================================
• Import any libraries needed for the simulation
• Display a welcome message in the Python Shell. Describe the program’s functionality
• Create the 500 x 500 graphics window named “Field”
• Set the Field window parameters as specified
TODO #2: Create the Crete cells – makeCrete()
========================================
• Write a function that creates three green circle objects (radius 8) and stores them in a list
• Each entry of the list represents one Crete cell
• The starting (x, y) locations of the Crete cells will be random values between 50 – 450
• The function should return the list of Crete cells
TODO #3: Create the Laelaps cell – makeLaelaps()
===========================================
• Write a function that creates a list containing a single entry; a red filled circle (radius 16)
representing the Laelaps cell
• The starting (x, y) location of these cells should be random values between 100–400
• Add two randomly selected integers to the list. They should be either -10 or 10
• The function should return the Laelaps cell list
TODO #4: Define the bounce() function
==================================
• Write a function that accepts two (2) integers as parameters
• If the first integer is either less than 10 or greater than 490, the function should return the
inverse value of the 2nd integer, (ie: multiplying it by -1)
• Otherwise, the function should return the 2nd integer unmodified
TODO #5: Define the main() function
==================================
• Using the makeCrete() function, create a list of Crete cells
• Draw the Crete cells in the Field graphics window
• Using the makeLaelaps() function, create the Laelaps list
• Draw the Laelaps cell in the Field window
• Using a while loop, animate the cells in the Field window
o Animate each Crete cell by moving it’s (x,y) position by a number of pixels specified
by a randomly selected integer between -4 and 4
o Animate the Laelaps cell by moving it’s (x,y) position by the number of pixels
specified in the integer values in it’s list (this will always be either -10 or 10 pixels)
o HINT: Use the bounce() function to make sure the change in a cell’s position doesn’t
move the cell outside the Field boundaries
o End the while loop if a mouse click is detected in the Field graphics window
• Close the Field graphics window
• Print a message that the simulation has terminated
Extra Credit Challenges: 10 points each only if TODO #1 – 5 are complete
===============================================================
• CROSSING GUARD: Laelaps cell ‘bounces’ off the Crete cells instead sliding past them
• NO PASSING ZONE: Crete cells bounce off each other instead of passing through
Project 1 Grading Rubric: Points
TODO #1: Libraries imported, message shown, graphics window created to specifications 15
TODO #2: List of three (3) circle objects is created as specified 10
TODO #2: makeCrete() function properly returns list of circle objects 5
TODO #3: List including one circle object and 2 integers is created as specified 10
TODO #3: makeLaelaps() function properly returns list 5
TODO #4: bounce() function created as specified 10
TODO #5: makeCrete() and makeLaelaps() functions called, lists created successfully 10
TODO #5: Crete and LaeLaps cells drawn in the Field window 5
TODO #5: Cells move as specified within the Field window, bouncing off boundaries 20
TODO #5: Animation loop terminates when mouse clicked in the Field window 5
TODO #5: Message is displayed indicating the simulation has terminated 5
Total Points 100
You will submit one (1) copy of the completed Python program to the Project 1 assignment on
Blackboard. The completed file will include your name, the name of the project and a description of
its functionality and purpose of in the comments header. The file should be named ”Project-1.py”.
Coding Standards and Guidelines:
=============================
In this project, you are required to follow modular coding standards, particularly with respect to
modular design, indentation and comments. Your score will be affected if your code does not
conform to these standards.
Modular Design
Divide your program into functions to improve readability and to reduce redundanct code. Your
Python code should not have repetitve copies of the same block of statements. Instead, functions
to simplify and reduce the size of your code.
For example, if you had to find the distance between two x,y coordinate points in several different
parts of your code, instead of creating the formula to calculate this distance over and over again,
create a function “def distance(x1, y1, x2, y2):” and code it to calculate and return the distance
between the point using the Pythagorean Theorum.
Indentation
Following are a few rules on how to use indentation in your program,
• Use tabs for indentations
• Pay attention to indentation in nested for loops and if-else blocks
Comments
Your code for this project must also include appropriate comments about how functions are
implemented. Comments make your code more readable and easier to understand.
• Add a comment before a function describing what it does.
• Before a nested for loop, describe what happens in the loop and what controls the
iterations.
• Before an if-else block, explain what should happen for both the true and false cases.
• Always make a priority of keeping the comments up-to-date when the code changes.
For all variables that you use in your program, use meaningful variable and function names to help
make your program more readable. Names do not have to be long, but should give a clear
indication of the intended purpose of the variable.

CS 177 – Project #2
Summer 2015
Due Date:
==========
This project is due Thursday July 23rd before 11:59pm.
This assignment is an individual project and should be completed on your own using only your own
personally written code. You will submit one (1) copy of the completed Python program to the
Project 2 assignment on Blackboard. The completed file will include your name, the name of the
project and a description of its functionality and purpose of in the comments header. The file should
be named ”Project-2.py”.
This project will continue to be the foundation of future assignments this semester, so it is important
that you maximize your program’s functionality.
Problem Description: Expanding the Cell Movement Simulation
=====================================================
Your first program simulating Betzig’s microscopic technology was a huge hit and you’ve landed a
contract to expand its capabilities. Specifically, you are to modify the behavior of both cell types,
increase their numbers and add a graphical control panel.
Crete Cells should be represented in this expanded simulation by a random number (between 5 –
12) of small green circles with a radius of 8 pixels. These cells will move nonlinearly in steps of up
to 6 pixels at a time, (specifically, each movement should be between -6 and 6 pixels). This will
increase the speed of their movements, however they will still appear jerky and random. Crete cells
cannot move outside the microscope slide, (the ‘field’), so they may bump along the borders or
even wander out into the middle of the field at times. They must bounce off each other and the
Laelaps cells instead of appearing to pass through them.
Laelaps cells should be represented by a random number (between 3 – 6) of larger red circles with
a radius of 16 in this expansion. Laelaps cells move across the field straight lines, appearing to
‘bounce’ off the field boundaries, and all the other cells in the field of view. The dx and dy values for
each Laelaps cell will be randomly chosen from: [-12, -10, -8, 8, 10, or 12] and will change
in direction but not size when animated, only in direction.
The Control Panel should be a separate 300 x 200 graphic window, (see example next page).
Users can view and change the simulation settings by clicking in the labeled areas to:
• Increase / decrease the speed of the simulation
• Pause the simulation
• Increase / decrease the temperature of the microscopic field
• Drop a piece of ‘food’ into a random location on the field
Project Specifications:
====================
The Field Graphics Window #1 (from Project 1)
• 500 x 500 pixel window
• White background
• 0,0 (x,y) coordinate should be set to the lower left-hand corner
The ‘Control Panel’ Graphics Window #2 (new)
• 300 x 200 pixel window
• Gray background organized as follows:
• Actual colors of buttons and text are flexible, but must be easy to see
• The speed and pause buttons must actually modify the simulation in real time
• Food button should drop a 5 x 5 black square of ‘food’ in a random Field location
• The Warmer and Cooler buttons only need to change the Temp value displayed.
Crete Cells (updated from Project 1)
• Random number (between 5-12) of green filled circles with radius of 8 pixels
• Move in random increments between -6 and 6 pixels per step
o Hint: use random.randint(-6, 6)
• Movements are not in straight lines, but appear wander aimlessly
• Bounces off Laelaps cells and other Crete cells — will not pass ‘through’ or over
• Crete cells ignore any ‘food’ in the field
Laelaps Cells (updated from Project 1)
• Random number (between 3-6) of red filled circles with a radius of 16 pixels
• The Laelaps cell should advance in either -12, -10, -8, 8, 10 or 12 pixels per step
o Hint: use random.choice([-12, -10, -8, 8, 10, 12])
• Move more quickly than Crete cells and in straight lines
• Bounces off Crete cells and other Laelaps cells – will not pass ‘through’ or over
• Laelaps cells ignore any ‘food’ in the field
Faster
Slower
Pause Food Warmer
Cooler
Temp
42
Speed
2
TODO #1: Start with your own completed Project 1 Python file
====================================================
• Refer to the Project 1 specifications for details
• You must complete Project 1 before continuing with this assignment
• Your TAs and/or Instructors can help you finish your Project 1 if necessary
TODO #2: Modify the makeCrete() and makeLaelaps() functions
==========================================================
• Change the makeCrete() and makeLaelaps() functions to meet Project 2 specifications
• The makeCrete() and makeLaelaps() functions should accept an integer parameter that
specifies the number of cells to create. They should return the lists of cells.
• The makeLaelaps() function might create a list of lists. This might take the format:
[[laelaps, dx, dy], [laelaps, dx, dy], [laelaps, dx, dy]]
TODO #3: Create the Control Panel
===========================================
• Create a new 300 x 200 graphics window named “Control Panel”
• This should have the appearance shown in the Project 2 specifications above
• The buttons and functionality of the Control Panel should be as specified above
TODO #4: Modify the main() function
==================================
• Using the makeCrete() function, create a list of Crete cells and draw in the Field window
• Using the makeLaelaps() function, create the Laelaps cells and draw in the Field window
• Using a while loop, animate the Crete and Laelaps cells in the Field window
o Animate each Crete cells making sure they bounce off the boundaries of the Field
window and the other Crete cells
o Animate the Laelaps cells making sure they bounce off the Field boundaries, the
other Laelaps cells and Crete cells
o Check for and respond to mouse clicks in the Control Panel graphics window
o End the while loop if a mouse click is detected in the Field graphics window
• Close the Field and Control Panel graphics windows
• Print a message that the simulation has terminated
Extra Credit Challenges: 10 points each only if TODO #1 – 5 are complete
===============================================================
• DINNER TIME: Cells contacting food will increase their radius by 2 pixels, (food disappears)
• HOT IN HERE: Higher temperatures cause Laelaps to move faster, Crete to move slower.
Lower temps would have the opposite effect.
Project 2 Grading Rubric: Points
TODO #1: Simulation meets all Project 1 Specifications 5
TODO #2: Crete cell creation and returned list updated as specified 10
TODO #2: Laelaps cell creation and returned list updated as specified 10
TODO #3: Control Panel: Graphics window created, appears as specified 10
TODO #3: Control Panel: Speed and Pause buttons function as specified 15
TODO #3: Control Panel: Food button functions as specified 10
TODO #3: Control Panel: Warmer and Cooler buttons function as specified 10
TODO #4: main() function uses makeCrete() and makeLaelaps() to create cell lists 5
TODO #5: Cells move as specified within the Field window 15
TODO #5: Animation terminates, windows close when mouse clicked in the Field window 5
TODO #5: Message is displayed indicating the simulation has terminated 5
Total Points 100
You will submit one (1) copy of the completed Python program to the Project 2 assignment on
Blackboard. The completed file will include your name, the name of the project and a description of
its functionality and purpose of in the comments header. The file should be named ”Project-2.py”.
Coding Standards and Guidelines:
=============================
In this project, you are required to follow modular coding standards, particularly with respect to
modular design, indentation and comments. Your score will be affected if your code does not
conform to these standards.
Modular Design
Divide your program into functions to improve readability and to reduce redundanct code. Your
Python code should not have repetitve copies of the same block of statements. Instead, functions
to simplify and reduce the size of your code.
For example, if you had to find the distance between two x,y coordinate points in several different
parts of your code, instead of creating the formula to calculate this distance over and over again,
create a function “def distance(x1, y1, x2, y2):” and code it to calculate and return the distance
between the point using the Pythagorean Theorum.
Indentation
Following are a few rules on how to use indentation in your program,
• Use tabs for indentations
• Pay attention to indentation in nested for loops and if-else blocks
Comments
Your code for this project must also include appropriate comments about how functions are
implemented. Comments make your code more readable and easier to understand.
• Add a comment before a function describing what it does.
• Before a nested for loop, describe what happens in the loop and what controls the
iterations.
• Before an if-else block, explain what should happen for both the true and false cases.
• Always make a priority of keeping the comments up-to-date when the code changes.
For all variables that you use in your program, use meaningful variable and function names to help
make your program more readable. Names do not have to be long, but should give a clear
indication of the intended purpose of the variable.
from graphics import *
from tkinter import *
import random
from random import randint
from time import sleep

print(“rnrn ===========================================================rn”)
print(“Welcome to this program. This program graphically simulates viewing cellular organisms through a microscope”)

winWidth = 500
winHeight = 500
win = GraphWin(‘Field’, winWidth, winHeight)
win.setCoords(0,0,winWidth, winHeight)

circleListCrete = []
circleListLaelaps = [‘a’,’b’,’c’]
positionLaelaps = [‘a’,’b’,’c’]

def makeCrete():
for i in range(0, 3):
greenCircle = Circle(Point(random.randint(50,450), random.randint(50,450)), 8)
greenCircle.setOutline(‘green’)
greenCircle.setFill(‘green’)
circleListCrete.append(greenCircle)
return circleListCrete

def makeLaelaps():
for i in range(0, 1):
positionLaelaps[0] = random.randint(100,400)
positionLaelaps[1] = random.randint(100,400)
redCircle = Circle(Point(positionLaelaps[0], positionLaelaps[1]), 16)
redCircle.setOutline(‘red’)
redCircle.setFill(‘red’)
circleListLaelaps[0] = redCircle
numberarray = [-10,10]
randominteger1 = random.choice(numberarray)
randominteger2 = random.choice(numberarray)
circleListLaelaps[1] = randominteger1
circleListLaelaps[2] = randominteger2
return circleListLaelaps

def bounce(intA, intB):
if (intA<10)or (intA>490):
return intB * -1
else:
return intB

def main():
dx = 10
dy = -10
makeCrete()
for i in circleListCrete:
i.draw(win)
makeLaelaps()
for x in circleListLaelaps[0:1]:
x.draw(win)
while 1:
for i in circleListCrete:
randomInteger3 = bounce(random.randint(-4,4), random.randint(-4,4))
randomInteger4 = bounce(random.randint(-4,4), random.randint(-4,4))
i.move(randomInteger3, randomInteger4)
sleep(0.1)
for x in circleListLaelaps[0:1]:
point1 = x.getCenter()
x1 = point1.getX()
y1 = point1.getY()
radius = 16
xLow = radius
xHigh = winWidth – radius
yLow = radius
yHigh = winHeight – radius
if x1 < xLow:
dx = -dx
elif x1 > xHigh:
dx = -dx
if y1 < yLow:
dy = -dy
elif y1 > yHigh:
dy = -dy
x.move(dx, dy)
sleep(0.01)
win.getMouse()
win.close()
print(“the simulation has been terminated”)

main()

find the cost of your paper