Identifies several relevant contexts when presenting a position. May be more aware of others’ assumptions than one’s own (or vice versa). Shows awareness of cultural considerations in an

Case Study Ron VenturaPreparing the case study [adapted from Buchbinder, Cox, & Casciani, 2014]: (a) Read the case study to identify the main point and key players. Highlight the main
points and identify themes. Review, asking questions: What is really going on? What are the problems? What is the main issue? How do the problems relate? What are the
underlying issues? Describe how or why these issues developed. (b) Research the problem or issue you have identified to help frame the issue and to make connections to
secondary issues. Use journal articles, and not website-based sources. (c) Decide how to “solve” or manage the issue. Consider who should be involved: what their
responsibilities might be, strengths and weaknesses, and so on. (d) Identify at least two alternative solutions and analyze their strengths and weaknesses (or describe
why they would or would not be effective). (e) Select the best alternative and explain how you will measure effectiveness.

Writing the case study [adapted from Buchbinder et al., 2014]: (a) Include a background statement to introduce what you will write about. Summarize the scenario, but
do not restate the scenario. Identify key points, the stakeholders, setting, and situation. (b) Discuss the specific issue and secondary issues and how they relate.
Support your analysis and explain your reasoning. (c) Describe the role perspective contributing to your solution, identifying strengths and weaknesses. (d) Describe
alternatives and the pros and cons of these. (e) End with a conclusion that addresses how to evaluate the effectiveness of the solution, or describe how effective
measures should be measured. Some case studies may conclude with a discussion of implications from the case.

Papers should include a title page, 2–4 pages of writing, and a reference list. Double-space and use Times New Roman 12-point font, one-inch margins, and APA style of
writing and citations. Please refer to the rubric about case studies to appreciate how you will be evaluated on your report. You will submit your case study report as
an attachment to the assignment box.

Critical thinking is a habit of mind characterized by the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts, and events before accepting or formulating an opinion
or conclusion. Case studies are meant to connect real-world scenarios with theoretical teachings. Students are expected to test assumptions and find creative ways to
consider all the facets contributing to analysis of the case.

Benchmark represents the minimal expectation of work. Each criterion that does not meet benchmark will be scored at zero.

Rubric
Critical Elements
Proficient
1.8
Accomplished
1.58
Benchmark
1.44
Explanation of Issues
Issue/problem to be considered critically is stated clearly and described comprehensively, delivering all relevant information necessary for full understanding.

Issue/problem to be considered critically is stated, described, and clarified so that understanding is not seriously impeded by omissions.

Issue/problem to be considered critically is stated, but description leaves some terms undefined, ambiguities unexplored, boundaries undetermined, and/or backgrounds
unknown.

APA Formatting and Style
Paper is well organized with a compelling introduction supported by strong evidence. The paper has a well-developed body, analysis, and conclusion. Demonstrates
greater than 95% compliance with APA format and grammar rules. Attribution is well documented.
Paper has strong introduction, body, analysis, and conclusion. Paper demonstrates between 85%-95% compliance with APA style and format. Student has a clear understand
of attribution for synthesis of several authors.
Paper is organized and has an introduction, body, limited analysis, and a conclusion. Paper demonstrates 80-85% compliance with APA format and style. Appropriately and
accurately paraphrases and summarizes without distortion of original content.
Evidence
Selecting and using information to investigate a point of view or conclusion
Information is taken from the case with enough interpretation/evaluation to develop a comprehensive analysis or synthesis.

Incorporates sources of evidence from at least one discipline-specific, peer-reviewed journal article and/or one source from an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed
journal. Viewpoints of experts are analyzed and synthesized.
Information is taken from the case with enough interpretation/evaluation to develop a coherent analysis or synthesis.

Incorporates at least one source of evidence from a peer-reviewed journal. Viewpoints of experts are subject to questioning, with weakness in synthesis, but with
enough analysis to develop a coherent consensus.
Information is taken from cases with some interpretation/evaluation, but may miss items that would develop a more coherent analysis or synthesis.

Sources from evidence obtained from course content and textbooks only. Viewpoints of experts are taken as mostly fact, with little questioning.
Influence of Context and Assumptions
Thoroughly (systematically and methodically) analyzes own (if applicable) and others’ assumptions and carefully evaluates the relevance of contexts when presenting a
position. Is mindful of the contextual principles of the specific discipline for which the student is enrolled, specifically cultural considerations in case analysis.
Identifies own and others’ assumptions and several relevant contexts when presenting a position. Is mindful of others’ assumptions and considers cultural
considerations in understanding and analyzing cases.
Questions some assumptions. Identifies several relevant contexts when presenting a position. May be more aware of others’ assumptions than one’s own (or vice versa).
Shows awareness of cultural considerations in an

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