In ?Shitty First Drafts?, Anne Lamott describes a time when she, ?eventually let [herself] trust the process- sort of, more or less.? Do you follow a process when writing? If so, when? Has this reading made you more conscious of the writing process when completing online assignments? What does Lamott mean when she says,? Very few writers know what they are doing until they have done it.??

discussion question :-
In ?Shitty First Drafts?, Anne Lamott describes a time when she, ?eventually let [herself] trust the process- sort of, more or less.? Do you follow a process when writing? If so, when? Has this reading made you more conscious of the writing process when completing online assignments? What does Lamott mean when she says,? Very few writers know what they are doing until they have done it.??

Shitty First Drafts
fl
ANNE LAMOTT

Born in San Francisco in 1954, Anne Lamott is a graduate of Goucher

College in Baltimore and is the author of six novels, including Rosie

(1983), Crooked Little Heart (1997), All New People (.2000), and Blue

Shoes(2002 ). She has also been the food reviewer for California magazine,

a book reviewer for Mademoiselle, and a regular contributor to Salon?s

?Mothers Who Think.? Her nonfiction books include Operating Instruc-

tiom: A journal of My Son?s First Year (1993), in which she describes her

adventures as a single parent; Traveling Mereies: Some Thoughts on Faith

(1999), in which she charts her journey toward faith in God; Plan B: Fur-

ther Thoughts on Faith (2005); and Grace (Eventually): Thoughts on Faith

(2007); and with her son Sam, Some Assembly Required: A Journal of My

Son?s First Son (2012).

In the following selection, taken from Lamott?s popular book about
writing, Bird by Bird (1994), she argues for the need to let go and write
those ?shitty first drafts? that lead to clarity and sometimes brilliance in
our second and third drafts.

WRITING To DISCOVER: Many professional writers view first drafts as

something they have to do before they can begin the real work of writing-

revision. How do you view the writing of your first drafts? What patterns, if any, do
you see in your writing behavior when working on first drafts? Is the work liberating?

Restricting? Pleasant? Unpleasant? Explain in a paragraph or two.

Now, practically even better news than that of short assignments is the
idea of shitty first drafts. All good writers write them. This is how they end
up with good second drafts and terrific third drafts. People tend to look at
successful writers, writers who are getting their books published and maybe
even doing well financially, and think that they sit down at their desks every
morning feeling like a million dollars, feeling great about who they are and
how much talent they have and what a great story they have to tell; that
they take in a few deep breaths, push back their sleeves, roll their necks a
few times to get all the cricks out, and dive in, typing fully formed passages
as fast as a court reporter. But this is just the fantasy of the uninitiated. I
know some very great writers, writers you love who write beautifully and
have made a great deal of money, and not one of them sits down routinely
feeling wildly enthusiastic and confident. Not one of them writes elegant
first drafts. All right, one of them does, but we do not like her very much.
We do not think that she has a rich inner life or that God likes her or can
h:c:laiiiand her. (Although when I, mentioned this to my priest friend Tom,
you can safely assume you ve created God 1n your own image when
It turns out that God hates all the same people you do.)

find the cost of your paper