Should embroyonic Stem cell be funded by the government

Should embroyonic Stem cell be funded by the government
follow the reading and the references is already provided… Also I am for ESC Research

Introduction
Embryonic stem cell (ESC) research is considered one of the most promising avenues for the discovery of ways to treat life threatening conditions. ESC research has been the center of much debate between medical researchers and pro-life advocates. The use of the embryonic stem cell is believed by many scientists to be important when it comes to studying diseases. Since they believe that working with the human cells at their most basic can easily lead to the breakthrough in treating spinal cord injuries, Parkinson’s and many other life-threatening conditions.
Government funding on the ESC research
There is still a huge debate as to whether the Government should fund the ESC research or not. The main aim is to discover treatments for debilitating diseases and this has been reiterated by the Obama administration. The question however is at what cost? A human embryo is considered a living form. However, considering that many states are pro-abortion, a common argument is that this does not violate the right to life but seeks to enhance it. In 2009, President Barrack Obama issued an executive order allowing federal money to pay for ESC research (Jensen, Hyllner & Björquist, 2009). Although Chief Judge Royce made a ruling which overturned President Obama’s executive order claiming the research violates the right to life and it also violated a 1987 law prohibiting the use of taxpayer money for any research which destroys the human embryo. The US Congress has considered spending millions of taxpayer’s money to stem cell research for a number of years (Miller, 2004). The main aim is to discover treatments for debilitating diseases and this has been reiterated by the Obama administration. The question however is at what cost? A human embryo is considered a living form. However, considering that many states are pro-abortion, a common argument is that this does not violate the right to life but seeks to enhance it.
War against ESC research
Both the church and law are in not in line with the ESC research since it destroys life. This research violates one of the Ten Commandments, (one shall not kill) and also violates the right to life (Herold, & Daley, 2007). Many feel that the government should invest itself in other areas since there are many other stakeholders that can provide funding for stem cell research such as biotech companies, as well as philanthropic organizations (Fry-Revere & Elgin, Public Stem Cell Research Funding, 2008). So far, such agencies have already invested millions of dollars in stem cell research. The politicized nature of the public debate over stem cell research may negatively impact the research itself (Moreno, Berger, & Rogers, 2007). A group of Americans that are against this kind of research have gone so far as to restrict private stem cell research efforts. In such instances, government funding fir stem cell research will not result in its advancement but rather the opposite is bound to occur.
Many people think that the government should fund the ESC research since the research has the potential of saving many lives, as only one life will be lost and several lives will be saved. The funding of the ESC research will enable the medical science to advance in humankind. On the other hand, others also argue that the governments need not to fund the ESC research since it destroys a human embryo, thus causing death of the unborn child.
Conclusion
The government should fund the ESC research since the cells have been derived from embryos that have been created by in-vitro fertilization for productive purposes. The stem cells can easily develop into any type of body tissue, and can help in treating diseases such as diabetes and heart diseases among other diseases.
References
Herold. E., & Daley, G. (2007). Stem Cell Wars: Inside Stories from the Frontlines. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Jensen, J; Hyllner, J; Björquist, P (2009). “Human embryonic stem cell technologies and drug discovery”. Journal of cellular physiology 219 (3): 513–9.
Miller, J. D. (2004). Public understanding of, and attitudes toward, scientific research: what we know and what we need to know. Public Understanding of Science, 273-294.
Moreno, J. D., Berger, S., & Rogers, A. (2007, April 12). Divided We Fail: The Need for National Stem Cell Funding. Retrieved from americanprogress.org: https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/general/report/2007/04/12/2943/divided-we-fail-the-need-for-national-stem-cell-funding/
Fry-Revere, S., & Elgin, M. (2008, September 3). Public Stem Cell Research Funding. Retrieved from cei.org: https://cei.org/studies-issue-analysis/public-stem-cell-research-funding

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