What are the short/long term causes of the event? Does it illustrate a pattern or general trend in international politics? If so, briefly explain what larger issue the story illustrates. Whose interests are involved and why? How is the event being handled by the relevant government(s) and by the international community?

News sources: the news stories should be a minimum of 2000 words combined and must include one of the following sources AND one foreign source: The New York Times TheWall Street Journal The Washington Post The Economist Associated Press Reuters Formats: 600-1000 words, 12 point font, 1-inch margins. Avoid/minimize full quotations.
Paper must provide full citations, per Chicago Manual of Style, either as footnotes or in a bibliographical entry. For example: da Costa, Ana Nicolaci. 2009. “Lula
China visit to focus on widening Brazil trade.” Reuters. Brasilia, 15 May. URL: http://www.reuters.com/article/OILPRD/idUSN1519138020090515?sp=true (accessed 1 March
2017). See Professor Dougherty’s rules on citation and bibliography below. The emphasis in these papers is on your analysis of the situation. The questions above are
the goals your paper should aim to achieve. Explain the story – give the relevant facts and provide the necessary background information. Questions to start with
include: What are the short/long term causes of the event? Does it illustrate a pattern or general trend in international politics? If so, briefly explain what larger
issue the story illustrates. Whose interests are involved and why? How is the event being handled by the relevant government(s) and by the international community?
What do they hope to accomplish by pursuing this policy? You do not need to address all these questions, or answer them in this order, but they are ways to get into
the analytic questions above. Do not be afraid to present your own assessment – for example, you could argue that the United Nations should strengthen sanctions on
Iran, or that the international community needs to set firm targets for the emission of greenhouse gases. The key to writing a quality news analysis is presenting an
organized argument/explanation, and backing that up with evidence. CITATION RULES, from Professor Dougherty 1. ALWAYS spellcheck AND proofread your papers. Spellcheck
cannot catch every mistake. 2. Document your sources. Citations are required whenever you use a direct quote, borrow ideas from a source, paraphrase, or cite
statistics / numbers (the number killed in an attack in Iraq, GNP, inflation rate, population, electoral results, etc). You do not need a citation if the information
is considered “common knowledge” (the name of the Iraqi prime minister, the date of the election) or is reported in multiple sources. If you are quoting directly from
a source, you must enclose the quote in quotation marks and include a citation. Quotes of three or more lines should be indented and single-spaced, and do not require
quotation marks. Extended quotes are discouraged and should be used infrequently. Using someone else’s words either verbatim or with only minor changes without a
citation constitutes plagiary. 3. Please follow the Chicago Manual of Style (use either footnotes or endnotes). The names of newspapers, books, magazines, and journals
are italicized. SAMPLE CITATION: Sidney Crosby, “Canadian Prime Minister Resigns,” New York Times, 13 January 1998. (after the first cite: Crosby, 13 January 1998.)
SAMPLE BIBLIOGRAPHY ENTRY: Crosby, Sidney. “Canadian Prime Minister Resigns.” New York Times, 13 January 1998. The bibliography includes articles you read on the
subject but did not cite in the text of the paper. It is organized alphabetically. 4. Please page numbers on your paper, and staple it. You should not to include a
separate title page. Put your name, the course, and the date of submission at the top of the first page. The bibliography does not count towards the page limit.

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